Author Archives: Dove Burns

Attorney Lawsuit over Overtime Pay

Professionals often require additional assistance handling time-consuming, but routine, tasks. This is particularly apparent in complex litigation that involves voluminous discovery and document review. Not surprisingly, document review can quickly become one of the more labor-intensive and expensive stages of the case. In order to meet this challenge, many firms will hire temporary attorneys to review the discovery for privilege and scope. Before doing so, query whether these firms consider the overtime implications of the FLSA.

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Is a Single Threat Enough to Trigger Liability For Retaliation?

Retaliation claims account for almost half of all EEOC claims filed nationwide. The 2014 EEOC Enforcement and Litigation data reflects that 42.8% of all EEOC charges are retaliation claims. Therefore, the crucial question when assessing the legal landscape for employers may be: what is enough to trigger liability for retaliation? The question of whether a threat to reduce pay constitutes an adverse employment action is before the Fifth Circuit. The underlying claim was dismissed at the trial level. A reversal of this decision could lead to a significant expansion of the scope of actionable retaliation in the Fifth Circuit and likely beyond.

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What Constitutes Harassment? Impact of New Law

Retaliation and harassment are the most commonly filed employment law claims nationwide. After the Fourth Circuit’s recent decision in Boyer-Liberto v. Fountainbleau Corp., No. 13-1473 (4th Cir. May 7, 2015) lawsuits alleging hostile work environment and harassment will only be more difficult for employers to dispose of. The Fourth Circuit held that a single instance of harassment may create an actionable hostile work environment claim, and that an employee can be protected from retaliation when complaining about harassment, even if the purported harassment is ultimately not severe enough to create a hostile work environment.

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Supreme Court Clarifies EEOC Conciliation Process

A growing concern of late among employers has been the often heavy-handed tactics of the EEOC with respect to its statutory obligations to pursue pre-suit conciliation processes. Though the EEOC is required by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to attempt settlement negotiations between an employer and the allegedly wronged employee prior to suing for a judicial intervention, many employers felt that the EEOC has been overly aggressive with its pre-suit tactics. The end result for these employers has been a rise in avoidable, costly, and occasionally reputation-damaging litigation.

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