Category Archives: Risk Management

The Importance of Record Retention

All professionals must maintain and follow a clearly documented record retention policy. These policies are more stringent and regulated for some professions. Each of the 50 states maintain regulations governing work-paper ownership and record retention for accountants, for example. Attorneys, too, may be guided by fairly specific record retention policies pursuant to the applicable Rules of Professional Conduct governing lawyers state-by-state. Despite these regulations, all classes of professionals routinely face legal woes as a result of poor record retention compliance. This risk intensifies as a result of cyber risk and associated liability from electronically stored information.

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Colorado Shooter’s Psychiatrist Sued for Medical Malpractice

The widow of a man killed in last year’s mass shooting in Aurora, Colorado has filed a lawsuit against the alleged gunman’s psychiatrist claiming she knew of his threats to harm others and failed to warn of the imminent danger. Issue: When is a psychiatrist obligated to warn the public of her client’s threats to the public? Lesson: Threats of imminent harm cannot be taken lightly and preventive measures should be taken despite the application of doctor-patient confidentiality.

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When Your Client Lies: What we can learn from Lance Armstrong

Lance Armstrong’s legal team played a part in each of the racing metals, the Livestrong brand, the endorsements, the accusations, the denials and of course the many lawsuits he filed to defend his reputation. Frankly, in light of the recent confession on Oprah, Armstrong’s attorneys may be feeling a bit uncomfortable.

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Engagement Letters 101 – The Professional Rule Book

The first rule of engagement letters: obtain a signed engagement letter. The second rule of engagement letters: obtain a signed engagement letter. The remaining rules are a bit more complicated. A well written engagement letter is absolutely critical to managing risk. It defines the scope of the engagement and, as a result, sets appropriate expectations with the client. An engagement letter may help to discourage meritless malpractice claims and may serve as “Exhibit A” in a dispositive motion. On the other hand, the lack of an engagement letter may result in an undefined engagement and may promote meritless, protracted litigation.

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