Employee’s ADA Claim is Out of Sight

Advancements in technology and software can help employers track employee productivity. But what happens when an employee’s medical condition influences her ability to use an employer’s technology? In Larson v. Oregonian Publishing, an Oregon Federal District court denied summary judgment to an employer in a disability discrimination lawsuit under the ADA under what’s known as the “cat’s paw theory”.
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Privilege in Interstate Litigation

Many legal issues are easier to articulate than they are to resolve.  For example, suppose State Y does not recognize a testimonial privilege but a witness is called to testify from State X which does recognize the privilege. Can the witness who holds the privilege claim it during litigation pending in State Y? Due to differing legal constructs applied by state courts, it can be an onerous task for counsel to determine whether certain documents or communications are considered privileged or are discoverable in interstate litigation.
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The Sweetness of Quick Closure through Funds from Other Sources

In the professional liability world, errors occur.  To quote Forrest Gump, “*%&# happens!” These errors can carry great consequences, and can include payouts by insurers under E&O policies.  However, what happens when there is a possibility to rectify the error and place the would-be plaintiff in a position where they were before?  Also, how conceivable is it to utilize funds from other sources as a means to bring closure to claims.
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#MeToo & Securities Class Action Suits

There is a growing phenomenon of securities class action and shareholder derivative suits arising from the #MeToo movement. Specifically, these suits address the alleged failure of corporations to disclose in public filings and/or prevent sexual harassment by corporate officers and directors. Moreover, the suits allege a corporate culture permitting such conduct to be engaged in. The latest suit targets a well-known pizza chain.
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NY Comes Down Hard On Student Hazing

On August 13, 2018, New York State Governor Andrew M. Cuomo signed an anti-hazing bill targeting student hazing at higher education institutions. The bill amends the New York Penal Code and prohibits certain physical contact as well as the physical activity requirements traditionally found in many student organizations’ initiation ceremonies, and which frequently result in serious injury, and sometimes in fatalities.
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Lawyers on a Short Leash: Bar Admission Restrictions

Unlike most licensed professions, the practice of law can significantly restrict an attorney's geographic mobility. If an attorney wishes to move to another state, it typically requires at least one year of planning before the move is possible. This may include studying for and successfully taking the new state's bar examination, re-taking the Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam, and going through another character and fitness review. However, the Uniform Bar Examination is now used in the majority of states and there appears to be significant momentum toward a more relaxed approach to attorney licensing. While a recent decision by the Ohio Board of Commissioners on Character and Fitness may appear to be a halt on this new trend, it will likely also serve as one of UBE proponents' key examples of an arguably archaic system that must be changed.
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Abusive Patient Creates Hostile Work Environment

The customer isn't necessarily always right. Neither is a patient. In Gardner v. CLC of Pascagoula, LLC, the Fifth Circuit Court analyzed an employer’s alleged failure to respond to a complaint of inappropriate actions of a patient in an assistant living facility. The allegations are unsettling. Plaintiff worked as a Nursing Assistant with the responsibility of caring for patients including one suffering from dementia, who had a long history of violent and sexual behavior toward fellow patients and staff. While being cared for by Plaintiff, the patient repeatedly grabbed her private areas and asked for explicit sexual acts. This was a daily occurrence. Allegedly, Plaintiff's complaints to her employer were effectively ignored. 
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Technological Advancements Complicate Confidentiality

The increase in connectivity has greatly improved an attorney's ability to represent her clients. From searching a party on social media, to quickly parsing through online materials, saves hours and hours of time. Furthermore, attorneys can leverage professional organization memberships to seek input from thousands of other practitioners on legal questions or strategic decisions. Thus, an attorney can investigate deeper than ever before and easily liaise with other practitioners. But, this cuts both ways. Attorneys must be aware that technological advances also mean that her own clients and experts are vulnerable, and they must take steps to protect confidential information as necessary.
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Here’s to an Uneventful July 4th

July 4 is not the ideal time to consider insurance but for too many it is a reality. By way of a reminder, after voting for independence on July 2, 1776, in the midst of the American Revolution, Congress turned its attention to the Declaration of Independence.  The document was a statement explaining this decision, which had been prepared by a committee led by Thomas Jefferson. Congress debated and revised the wording of the Declaration, finally approving it on July 4, 1776. The following year, Americans celebrated their independence with fireworks and the tradition continues today. Let’s celebrate our Nation’s birthday safely. Reportedly, there are more than $35 million in fire damages every July 4. On average, about 7 fireworks related deaths are reported each year (along with 20,000 injuries per year from BBQ grill accidents!). As we reflect on and enjoy the holiday, be smart and stay safe. Happy 4th of July from your friends at Professional Liability Matters.
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